Cognitive restructuring with perpetrators of violence in a jail-based setting: An outcome study of effects on recidivism and predicting success

Jonathan Gilbert Forlines, Tennessee State University

Abstract

A jail-based cognitive restructuring treatment program targeted Violent Offenders whom research had identified as being at high risk of reoffending. Research had also shown this treatment to be progressively more effective in significantly reducing this high risk population's recidivism rates based, on their level of risk for reoffending going into the program. In its four years of existence there has not been a formal outcome study to evaluate the program's effectiveness by measuring the level of change that the program has made toward reducing the recidivism rates of its participants? This study addressed this gap in knowledge. The sample used in the study was 198 male inmates comprising 102 African-American subjects, 92 Euro-American subjects, 1 Hispanic subject, and 3 subjects whose race information was not available. Their ages ranged from 18 to 58 years. Cognitive restructuring was found to be significantly effective in reducing recidivism in high risk offenders. Ways in which treatment impacted recidivism were explained and suggestions were made for changes in correctional practice based on results of the research findings. ^

Subject Area

Sociology, Criminology and Penology|Psychology, Cognitive

Recommended Citation

Jonathan Gilbert Forlines, "Cognitive restructuring with perpetrators of violence in a jail-based setting: An outcome study of effects on recidivism and predicting success" (1998). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3007603.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3007603

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