Academic suspension for developmental studies at Middle Tennessee State University: Is it effective?

Jennifer Leppert Dooley, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This study compared the graduation rates of developmental studies students who were placed on academic suspension at Middle Tennessee State University semesters spring 1990 through fall 1992 to graduation rates of non-developmental studies students who were suspended during the same period. The study also compared the graduation rates of developmental students who were suspended for failure to pass a developmental course in two or fewer attempts to the graduation rates of developmental students who were suspended for failure to maintain the GPA required by the university. In addition, the study compared the graduation rates of suspended students, both developmental and non-developmental, who were readmitted to the university on appeal of the suspension. A series of two-way X2 tests were conducted which revealed that: (1) graduation rates of suspended developmental studies students and non-developmental studies students are independent, (2) graduation rates of suspended students (both developmental and non-developmental) who are readmitted on appeal of the suspension and graduation rates of those suspended students who were not readmitted on appeal are not independent, and (3) graduation rates of developmental students who were suspended for failure to maintain the required GPA and those who were suspended for failure to pass a developmental course in two or fewer attempts are independent. All X2 were conducted at the p < .05 level of significance. ^

Subject Area

Education, Guidance and Counseling|Education, Curriculum and Instruction|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Jennifer Leppert Dooley, "Academic suspension for developmental studies at Middle Tennessee State University: Is it effective?" (2000). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3007601.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3007601

Share

COinS