A comparative study of the demographics for Black female administrators and their peers employed in the Tennessee Board of Regents system

Johnetta Johnson Mooreland, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate Black female and peer administrators in the TBR system based on demographics of race, gender, age, education level, and years of experience, during 1990 and 1998. The study identified factors that were significant among professionals holding administrative positions in the Tennessee Board of Regents System (TBR). ^ A comparative analysis was made of 760 TBR administrators employed during 1990 with a similar group for 1998. These TBR administrators were grouped by year, race/ethnicity, age, gender, educational level, and years of experience. The data obtained were treated with the chi-square analysis technique to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences at the .05 level or better. ^ The total number of male administrators exceeded their counterpart female population by a margin of 2 to 1. Whites surpassed Black administrators by a margin of 4 to 1 for the academic years of 1990 and 1998. ^ The chi-square treatment functions were based upon actual observed values against those that were expected given the parameters of the analysis method. Some of the related conclusions that surfaced in this regard were: (1) in 1990, White female, Black male, and Other Race administrators were found to be present in fewer numbers than expected given the chi-square formula. During 1998, this pattern for Black female and White male administrators continued. There were fewer White female and Black male administrators, though the differences were not significant; (2) for 1990, in accordance with the chi-square, it was expected that more White males would have been under the age 35, with more Black females checking in over the age 36; (3) during 1990, utilizing the chi-square treatment, it was expected more Black females would have earned Doctorate degrees, while fewer were expected to have Master's degrees. More White males were expected to have Master's degrees, with fewer holding Doctorate degrees. This pattern continued in 1998 though the differences were not significant; (4) for 1990, Black females and Other Race administrators held Master's degrees in greater numbers than expected, although in 1998 the differences were not significant; (5) during 1990, Black female administrators with less than 5 years local experience were noted in greater numbers than expected, while White male administrators with more than 6 years local experience were found in greater numbers than expected, although in 1998 these differences were not significant; and (6) the ANOVA was utilized to treat data relative to age for administrators during 1990 and 1998. It was used to determine whether years of experience had an effect upon the size of the racial composition of the TBR administrators' pool. Of this population, administrators who were thirty-six and older, with more local and total experience, had a higher percentage of representation in TBR administrative ranks. ^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Women's Studies|Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

Johnetta Johnson Mooreland, "A comparative study of the demographics for Black female administrators and their peers employed in the Tennessee Board of Regents system" (2000). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3007586.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3007586

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