A study of articulation and academic success comparing single institution and transfer students in the Tennessee Board of Regents' system of higher education, 1993--1999

Carol Goodman Bompart, Tennessee State University

Abstract

During the 1990s, higher education was in great turmoil and transition. Reported by the literature, this was due, in part, to declining enrollments, demographically different student populations, and budgetary restraints. As a result, accountability and student retention became a primary focus for higher education. For reasons of cost, proximity to home, small class size, athletics, and increased admission requirements at many universities, more students chose community colleges as their entry points to a post-secondary education. The community colleges has continued a tradition of open door admissions, low tuition, flexible programming, customized services, along with quality learning opportunities, so more students began their academic careers at the community colleges and then transferred to the university, so this issue became critical to the university. Due to this interest, this longitudinal, archival study focused on the correlates of student academic success. This study examined the differences between single institution, non-articulated transfer, and articulated transfer students who were university bound. The students were studied beginning with pre-matriculation to post-secondary institutions and ended with graduation or withdrawal from the university within the Tennessee Board of Regents system. The population of the study included all the entering freshmen in the fall semester of 1993 to the universities and community colleges in the Tennessee Board of Regents' system. These students were tracked through the spring semester of 1999. It was hypothesized that single institution students performed better, than transfer students. Analysis was accomplished using the Statview Computer Program. This study revealed statistically significant differences in the demographic characteristics of gender, ethnicity and handicap, but not age. The pre-matriculation characteristics of high school GPAs and ACT scores were found to have statistically significant differences. Sophomore GPAs had statistically significant differences among the groups. Time to graduation and the post-matriculation characteristics of GPAs, enrollment status and retention were found to be have no statistically significant differences. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Carol Goodman Bompart, "A study of articulation and academic success comparing single institution and transfer students in the Tennessee Board of Regents' system of higher education, 1993--1999" (2001). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI3007556.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI3007556

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