The Relationship That Generalized Self-Efficacy, Racial Identity, and Self-Esteem Have on African American College Students' Academic Achievement

Alex Hill, Tennessee State University

Abstract

In this research, generalized self-efficacy, self-esteem, and racial identity are examined to discover the nature of the relationship that these variables have with academic achievement. This study focused on whether or not generalized self-efficacy, self-esteem, and racial identity have a significant, negative, or positive relationship with academic achievement. In addition, there were 114 participants from Tennessee State University, a historically Black university, that were used to help solidify the findings of this study. The current study found that none of the independent variables share a relationship with academic achievement. However, the variables do prove to have a positive relationship with academic achievement.^

Subject Area

African American Studies|Black Studies|Education, Sociology of|Education, Educational Psychology

Recommended Citation

Alex Hill, "The Relationship That Generalized Self-Efficacy, Racial Identity, and Self-Esteem Have on African American College Students' Academic Achievement" (2011). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI1502722.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI1502722

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