The Relationship between Stress, Coping and Demands of Ministry among Religious Leaders

Shelecia Springer, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The goal of the research was to determine the relationship between Stress, Coping and Ministry Demands. One hundred and seventy six Protestant, religious leaders participated, both male and female. One purpose of this research was to determine the relationship between the increase in social and family support and the relationship it has on the impact of ministry demands. The study examined whether there was a positive relationship between those who score high on the (DSES) and determined if they were more likely to use positive coping skills measured by the (CSQ). The study also examined whether religious personnel are more likely to use positive coping skills then negative coping skills measured by the (CSQ) to cope with stress. In addition, the study also examined whether religious personnel utilized prayer, mediation and enhancement of spiritual life as one the most frequent mean of dealing with stress. In conclusion, significance was found between an increase in social/family support and less impact of ministry demands. There was no relationship between high (DSES) scores and positive coping skills. There was also evidence that religious personnel are more likely to use more positive coping skills than negative coping skills to coping with stress. In addition, religious personnel were more likely to pray, mediate and enhance their spiritual life as one of the most frequently used tactic in dealing with stressful situations.^

Subject Area

Religion, General|Psychology, Industrial

Recommended Citation

Shelecia Springer, "The Relationship between Stress, Coping and Demands of Ministry among Religious Leaders" (2011). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI1492301.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI1492301

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