The anti-microbial effects of Camellia sinesis on Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus

Ryan Clark, Tennessee State University

Abstract

World wide antibiotic misuse has triggered an increase of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms and as strains of Bacteria continue adapting to antibiotics, it has become paramount to conduct research for natural sources as potential anti-bacterial agents. Camellia sinensis, are plants that have supplied the world with tea for over 4,000 years, has a wide range of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-helminthic properties. In the current investigation, we used an in vitro study to explore the anti-microbial activity of green, white and black tea; three varieties of tea produced from Camellia sinensis. Crude methanol extracts from each tea, at .005325g/mL and .0165g/mL concentrations were prepared, and exposed to Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Eschericia coli for up to fifteen minutes. We determined the anti-microbial effects of the extracts by the inhibition of the bacterial colony forming units. The results, evaluated as significantly different by paired t-test, showed white tea, at an extract concentration of .0165g/mL, exhibited the most antibacterial activity. Statistically, none of the extracts significantly inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus or Eschericia coli. Salmonella typhimurium was most susceptible to .0165g/mL white and black tea extracts after five minutes of exposure and to only .0165g/mL white tea extract concentration after fifteen minutes of exposure. ^

Subject Area

Biology, Microbiology

Recommended Citation

Ryan Clark, "The anti-microbial effects of Camellia sinesis on Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus" (2009). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI1467897.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI1467897

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