Vocational identity development and affect among African-American and Caucasian undergraduate men

Marquitta M Henry, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine whether there were differences in vocational identity and affect between African-American and Caucasian undergraduate men, as measured by the My Vocational Situation Vocational Identity subscale (Holland, Daiger, & Power, 1980) and PANAS (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988). The sample consisted of 235 participants of whom 159 were Caucasian and 76 were African-American college men. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics (t-test, Pearson r correlations, and a multiple linear regression). Statistical analyses revealed: (a) there was not a significance difference between African-American and Caucasian college men's vocational identity; (b) there was a signicant relationship between vocational identity and affect; and (c) there were significant racial differences in the impact of affect on vocational identity. This study provides important information related to understanding differences in vocational identity and affect among African Americans and Caucasian. Based on these findings, implications and future research are discussed. ^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Education, Educational Psychology|Psychology, Developmental

Recommended Citation

Marquitta M Henry, "Vocational identity development and affect among African-American and Caucasian undergraduate men" (2009). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI1467894.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI1467894

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