Examining knowledge and stereotypes regarding HIV/AIDS and attitudes toward condom use in an HBCU population

Brian C Griner, Tennessee State University

Abstract

This research explores the knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS of African American students attending an Historically Black College/University in Middle Tennessee. The primary goal of this thesis was to identify areas where there is a lack of knowledge with regard to HIV/AIDS among African American college students, as well as to identify stereotypical thinking. The findings can be used to create more effective HIV/AIDS prevention programs as well as to decrease stereotypical thinking with regard to HIV/AIDS. African American students' knowledge of the modes of transmission of HIV in relation to the reported condom use was examined. As has been reported by Klein, Roghmann, and Siegel (1999), only 88% of college students aged 20-24 years state that they use contraceptives. Klein, et al. (1999) further stated that of the 88% using contraceptives only 15% reported using condoms consistently. This study also examined which, if any, stereotypes African American college students held regarding HIV/AIDS as well as any differences between male and female participants in the type and/or number of stereotypes held in regard of HIV/AIDS. This research explores the knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS of African American students attending an Historically Black College or University in Middle Tennessee. The research also examines any stereotypes held toward HIV/AIDS as well as attitudes toward condom use within the same population. ^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Psychology, Social|Health Sciences, Public Health

Recommended Citation

Brian C Griner, "Examining knowledge and stereotypes regarding HIV/AIDS and attitudes toward condom use in an HBCU population" (2009). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI1467893.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI1467893

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