An Evaluation of the Jostens Renaissance Program on Award-Winning High Schools' Attendance Rates and Graduation Rates

Phillip C Campbell, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the Jostens Renaissance program on attendance rates and graduation rates at award-winning high schools. This evaluation was conducted by (a) comparing the two-year averages of attendance rates and graduation rates of award-winning high schools prior to the implementation of the Jostens Renaissance program to the two-year averages of attendance rates and graduation rates after an award was received through a paired samples t-test and (b) by examining the perceptions of award-winning renaissance coordinators through an open-ended five question interview. Major findings of the quantitative portion of the study included (a) no statistically significant difference in attendance rates (p = .773) and (b) a statistically significant difference in graduation rates (p = .000, Eta squared = .66). Major findings of the qualitative portion of the study included themes centered on the importance of relationships, creating a sense of ownership and pride for all stakeholders, and the value of attending the Jostens Renaissance National Conference. The findings of this study are significant to practitioners in search of methods and strategies to improve graduation rates and the overall culture and climate of their schools. Recommended future studies include replicating this study after the award-winning coordinator resigns their position, analyzing the commonalities of the strategies used to attain award-winning status, replicating this study to examine discipline rates, and replicating this study on low-achieving and/or socioeconomically disadvantaged schools.^

Subject Area

Educational leadership|Educational administration

Recommended Citation

Phillip C Campbell, "An Evaluation of the Jostens Renaissance Program on Award-Winning High Schools' Attendance Rates and Graduation Rates" (2016). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI10158677.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI10158677

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