An Internet-based ACT intervention for racist and sexist prejudice

Teresa A Young, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of acceptance and commitment training on various outcome measures related to prejudice and discrimination. This study sought to bridge the gap between mindfulness- and acceptance-based approaches and multicultural education using an Internet-based module. Minimal research has examined the interplay of these aspects of the study. Outcome variables involved the ability to recognize racist and sexist microaggressions, personal levels of racism and sexism, and willingness to intervene during a racist or sexist event. Participants were randomly assigned to either the intervention or control groups and completed pre-, post-, and follow-up questionnaires designed to assess the listed outcome variables. It was hypothesized that the ACT intervention would increase ability to recognize microaggressions, decrease personal levels of racism and sexism, and increase willingness to intervene when a racist or sexist event occurs. The final sample included 31 college-age men and women from both a Historically Black College/University (HBCU) and a Predominantly White Institution (PWI). Results did not support an increase in ability to recognize racist and sexist microaggressions or willingness to intervene during a prejudicial event. Univariate analyses of item-specific responses yielded promising results, however. These findings provide opportunities for future research and social change.^

Subject Area

Educational sociology|Social psychology|Counseling Psychology|Ethnic studies

Recommended Citation

Teresa A Young, "An Internet-based ACT intervention for racist and sexist prejudice" (2016). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI10158564.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI10158564

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