The effect of head-injury, dissociation, and self-esteem on interpersonal violence

Kendra Parks, Tennessee State University

Abstract

The focus of this study will be to examine different variables that can effect interpersonal violence. Dissociation, head injury, and self-esteem have all been studied independently in relation to aggressive behavior, but not directly linked to interpersonal violence collectively. Sixty-five participants in a domestic violence counseling group participated in the examination of the relationship between interpersonal violence with self-reported head injury, dissociation, and self-esteem. It was hypothesized that self-reported head injury, dissociation, and self-esteem will have a positive relation and predict interpersonal violence. Results from multiple regression show the three independent variables effect aggression levels significantly. From the commonality analysis, dissociation was found to provide the highest unique variance along with self-esteem having the second highest unique variance. Dissociation and self-esteem held a high shared variance toward physical aggression, while head injury had a negative effect whenever it was added to other variables in the regression equation.^

Subject Area

Counseling Psychology

Recommended Citation

Kendra Parks, "The effect of head-injury, dissociation, and self-esteem on interpersonal violence" (2015). ETD Collection for Tennessee State University. Paper AAI10003133.
http://digitalscholarship.tnstate.edu/dissertations/AAI10003133

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